I suggest you ...

(Syntax) Allow invocation of reversed relations by "the [noun] [verb]".

If I have a relation "love," relating various people to various people, and I want to loop through the people that Chris loves, I have to (I believe) define a verb that implies the reversed loving relation and use that in the loop (e.g., "repeat with sweetie running through the people are beloved of Chris"). Would it be feasible to allow "repeat with sweetie running through people that Chris loves" to have the same effect? So that the description "[kind] that [noun] [relation]" would be equivalent to [kind] that [reversed-relation] [noun]", without needing to explicitly define the reversed relation.

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    matt weiner shared this idea  ·   ·  Admin →

    4 comments

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      • matt weiner commented  · 

        Whoops, I just saw this two years later. Ron is correct about what I want, though since "are loved by Chris" works it's probably not worth the extra hassle.

      • Ron Newcomb commented  · 

        I believe he's asking for "people that Chris loves" as a shorter syntax than "people that are loved by Chris" even though he's aware they are equivalent.
        (I agree the former he's asking for is easier to think of.)

      • AdminJesse McGrew (Admin, Inform 7) commented  · 

        You should be able to refer to "people who are loved by Chris", as long as you include the "he/she is loved" form in your definition of "to love".

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